Interested in Volunteering 

 

Volunteering Why not look into becoming an Volunteer Advocate? Can you spare a few hours a week to help? Contact the office to find out more. 

We have a number of volunteering opportunities, each requiring different qualities and skills. 
Whether you are 
passionate about older people’s issues 
a good listener and easy to get on with 
like helping to right wrongs 
like getting out and about and talking to people 
enjoy raising money 
Then you could be the person we need. 
Call in for an informal chat with Staff. 
Full training will be given and a full disclosure and barring check will be required. For all our volunteering roles the amount of time and commitment is determined by yourself, anything freely given is always greatly appreciated and expenses are paid. 
 

The Vocal Volunteer 

Team work. I have always worked as a member of a team, and I must say, I am very used to it. Myself and my husband are a team, my family are a team, and the people I have worked with have all been parts of teams. Sounds a bit sickly ~ (I can almost hear you saying Y-U-K !!) ~ and you can be forgiven for that, except I love the feeling of everyone helping each other. 
 
Back in the day when I worked for Social Services, myself and another team member were transferred to a different office in a nearby town. Still working for an Older Persons Unit, we thought the set-up would be the same as the one we had left. Wrong!! We were used to chatting together, to make coffee for each other, and the best bit of all, was when we came back from a stressful visit, and found a friendly face who put the kettle on. Support being there as and when needed. Not so in this new office. No one welcomed us, no one spoke, and no one seemed to speak each other. Heads down, it was work work work!! We sorted the new little office which the two of us shared, put our bits and pieces in place, and sat looking at each other for a couple of days. The others in a larger office got on with their worky things, not looking up when we breezed in, and probably thinking we were from the devil himself judging by their expressions!! 
 
So ~ one lunchtime my colleague went to the toy shop and bought some plastic traffic cones that kiddies play with. Lots of them. I bought some ground coffee and fairy cakes, and we set out the double row of cones from their doorway, down the corridor to our office, in such a way, that they couldn't miss the road to our office without climbing over them. There they stood, in our doorway, with surprised faces wondering what had just happened, and we met them with filtered coffee and cakes, and most importantly got to know them!!! Job done. Only one thing though. The cleaners had to pass, the admin staff had to pass, and the bosses had to pass, all on their way out, so we even got to know all of them too!!! Ps~ fairy cakes ran out all too soon!! 
 
A great success, 'cause at Christmas we were all so much part of a team, that we got the tree up, decorated it whilst listening to the carols on the radio, and arranged our small gifts under it. Aww, happy days with the group of people who became our friends and who all came to stay at our guest house when my husband and I moved to Devon. 
 
And so to Advocacy!! I have found that being an advocate means very much working on your own with your client. Due to confidentiality being the core of how we work, I find after a visit to a client, that I can only share that visit by completing my case notes on our database (get me!!). With coffee!! For me, it's like unburdening. Sometimes I have found myself wanting to discuss a particular situation, and with no one to share it with, I have rung my Boss-Lady (sorry, Service Manager) just to discuss it and clear my head. She understands, and is always available, even with the pressure of her own work-load. If I pop into the office, there is always a coffee and a chat with someone, and mostly a laugh or two into the bargain!! Thank you! 
 
I wonder if the person who stumbled across a coffee bean in years gone by, would ever have thought it would be responsible for teams being built?? 
 
Vocal Volunteer 
 

 

An Advocate 
An advocate will typically take the issue concerning the client, such as an energy supplier issue, discuss the outcome required and then give the client options as to an appropriate way forward. An advocate never gives advice, rather they enable the client to access the information required to work towards an outcome. Within this process the advocate may be required to write letters, make telephone calls on the clients' behalf or attend meetings with the client to ensure the clients' point of view is heard. 
 
An advocate gives the client a helping hand to put their life back on track and make a real difference at a practical level. We do not require a fixed amount of time from our volunteer advocates, time commitment is determined by you. 
A Community Friend 
If you have a few hours spare and you like talking to people, why not become a Community Friend volunteer. This role could involve attending activities, such as coffee mornings or events within the community and informing them about OCAY's service. 
 
Or you could deliver leaflets and call on homes in your local area to let people know about our service. 
There are opportunities to talk to a group, such as a care home setting, another local charity or other organisations to raise the profile of OCAY. 
 
Information and guidance within this role will be provided and support given in preparing for different activities. Again we are flexible and the time commitment is very much at your discretion. 
A Fundraiser 
Help us to organise fund raising events 
Could you help run a coffee morning? 
Can you make things to sell on a stall? 
Could you organise an event to raise funds? 
 
Please get in touch 
A Trustee 
Trustees have collective responsibility for ensuring that OCAY pursues its charitable objectives. They give strategic direction to the organisation, setting overall policy, defining goals, setting targets and evaluating performance against agreed targets. They are responsible for ensuring the effective and efficient administartion of OCAY and seeking to ensure its financial stability. They must have integrity, and need commitment and goodwill towards OCAY, with time to give preparing for and participating in meetings and undertaking other activities on behalf of the charity. 
 
The trustee meetings are bi-monthly. 
An Advocate 
An advocate will typically take the issue concerning the client, such as an energy supplier issue, discuss the outcome required and then give the client options as to an appropriate way forward. An advocate never gives advice, rather they enable the client to access the information required to work towards an outcome. Within this process the advocate may be required to write letters, make telephone calls on the clients' behalf or attend meetings with the client to ensure the clients' point of view is heard. 
 
An advocate gives the client a helping hand to put their life back on track and make a real difference at a practical level. We do not require a fixed amount of time from our volunteer advocates, time commitment is determined by you. 
A Community Friend 
If you have a few hours spare and you like talking to people, why not become a Community Friend volunteer. This role could involve attending activities, such as coffee mornings or events within the community and informing them about OCAY's service. 
 
Or you could deliver leaflets and call on homes in your local area to let people know about our service. 
There are opportunities to talk to a group, such as a care home setting, another local charity or other organisations to raise the profile of OCAY. 
 
Information and guidance within this role will be provided and support given in preparing for different activities. Again we are flexible and the time commitment is very much at your discretion. 
A Fundraiser 
Help us to organise fund raising events 
Could you help run a coffee morning? 
Can you make things to sell on a stall? 
Could you organise an event to raise funds? 
 
Please get in touch 
A Trustee 
Trustees have collective responsibility for ensuring that OCAY pursues its charitable objectives. They give strategic direction to the organisation, setting overall policy, defining goals, setting targets and evaluating performance against agreed targets. They are responsible for ensuring the effective and efficient administartion of OCAY and seeking to ensure its financial stability. They must have integrity, and need commitment and goodwill towards OCAY, with time to give preparing for and participating in meetings and undertaking other activities on behalf of the charity. 
 
The trustee meeting are bi-monthly.